The Transformation of a Pole Barn – Part 2

In part 1, we detailed how our pole barn was transformed into a real, enclosed barn.  But there was still a lot of work to do to make the barn animal-ready.

The north end – about 20×30 – is the new sheep and goat quarters.  What we’ve learned about raising sheep and goats together is that goats are dominant and will bully sheep.  Therefore we decided to separate them, using an internal wall to keep each on their side.

The layout had to include a dog run for Kilo and Karina, to allow them to sleep – and bond – with their future charges.  The internal layout wound up being driven by the dog run, as we erected it first and then used its walls to form the walls dividing the sheep and goats.

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The dog run started with a cattle panel laid on the ground – in addition to providing stability to the structure, it prevents them digging out.  Side panels attached to the floor panel have smaller openings than a cattle panel, to prevent them climbing through the holes.  The tube was completed by another cattle panel across the top, to prevent them climbing out.  Panels cut to fit the ends, one affixed and the other hinged – completed the dog run.  The dimensions are 50″ (the height of a livestock panel) and the whole structure is 16′ long.

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The dog run taken from the sheep side, looking through it to the goat side.

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Looking at the front of the dog run and the internal gate leading into the sheep area

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The goat huts stacked in the corner of the goat side are in use. The goats sleep in the bottom one, while the top one serves as storage for minerals, hoof clippers and scale.

A hay wall at each end will allow them to eat without making too big a mess.  And a mineral feeder in each side will allow all animals access to the minerals formulated for their species.

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Winter has been and gone and it is now spring.  The sheep and goats quickly adapted to the routine of coming in at night and separate themselves into their sleeping quarters.  Best of all it keeps them safe and happy.  Meanwhile I sleep better at night knowing they are safe.

 

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